New Yorker Magazine Covers for the New Year

New Yorker new year magazine cover

For me, the start of a new year is an excuse to plan my next New York trip. So today, I set the ball rolling with some internet exploration, only to get immediately distracted by this cool collection of New Yorker magazine covers on The New Yorker website. Each one was published at the start of a new year, with some dating back to the 1920s. I mean, I know they’re not technically travel related, but they do offer some food for New York thought. They’re also far too beautiful not to share.

I could pretty much spend all day flicking through archives of New Yorker magazine covers. The scenes are filled with so many intriguing details, the colours are enticing, and they always make you want to turn the page. My favourite might be Rea Irvin’s cover from 1927 depicting time as a wise bearded old man perched on a fluffy cloud, or maybe Victor De Pauw’s from 1946 showing a packed Times Square filled with midnight party-goers waiting to bring in the new year. It’s a tough call. Happy new year and enjoy…

Top cover: 2 January 1926, by Rea Irvin

new yorker new year magazine covers

31 December 1927, by Rea Irvin

 

new yorker magazine new year covers

28 December 1935, by William Cotton

New Yorker magazine covers for the new year4

31 December 1938, by Rea Irvin

1 January 1944, by Peter Arno

New Yorker magazine covers for the new year

28 December 1946, by Victor De Pauw

New Yorker magazine covers for the new year

31 December 1949, by Mary Petty

New Yorker magazine covers for the new year

30 December 1961, by Beatrice Szanton

8 January 1996, by Edward Sorel

New Yorker magazine covers for the new year

5 January 1998, by Harry Bliss

New Yorker magazine covers for the new year

27 December 1999, by Owen Smith

New Yorker magazine covers for the new year

4 January 2010, by Ivan Brunetti

Psst! Have you read The New Yorker Book of the 40s?

One Comment

Lyall

What a find! If I had to choose, I think my favorites would have to be the 1946 Times Square crowd and the Night Hawks of 1999. Even though the latter has been parodied so many time before, you can never overdo the Hopper!

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